Category: The J. Geils Band

The J. Geils Band – Full House

ARTIST:  The J. Geils Band              j-_geils_band_-_live_full_house

TITLE:  Full House

YEAR RELEASED: 1972

CHART ACTION: #54

SINGLES: Hard Drivin’ Man

OTHER SONGS YOU MAY KNOW: First I Look at the Purse, Whammer Jammer, Looking for a Love

LINEUP: Peter Wolf, J. Geils, Seth Justman, Magic Dick, Danny Klein, Stephen Bladd

WHAT’S IT ALL ABOUT: White hot and fun live album – that displays the great live band they were.

SOME WORDS, PHRASES AND CLAUSES ABOUT THIS RECORD: Live albums got to be a cliché in the 70’s, but this single LP live set from the J. Geils Band shows how thrilling live records could be, especially for a band that thrived on performance.

Every member of the band has a chance to shine. Magic Dick, of course, gets his turn in “Whammer Jammer”, showing the world his harmonica skills. J. Geils is an underrated and tasteful guitarist, and Seth Justman’s talent is greater than his 21 years (he was the baby of the group – five to nine years younger than his bandmates).

Then there’s Peter Wolf. No one can even come close to Wolf’s enthusiasm and spirit on these live albums, leading, exhorting, pleading with the audience to participate and lose themselves in the tunes.

Most of these songs were covers – mainly forgotten soul and blues songs, with three originals that sounded just like them. This is a much better representation for the band than their first two studio records.

NOTES & MINUTIAE: This was recorded in Detroit and the Cinderella Ballroom. They were a Boston band, but Detroit was like a second ome to them.

IS THERE A DELUXE VERSION: No

GRADE: A:  A fantastic single-disc live album that makes you definitely wish you were there.

The J. Geils Band – The Morning After

ARTIST: The J. Geils Band J._Geils_Band_-_The_Morning_After

TITLE:  The Morning After

YEAR RELEASED: 1971

CHART ACTION: #64

SINGLES: Looking for a Love (#39), I Don’t Need You No More

OTHER SONGS YOU MAY KNOW: Whammer Jammer, Cry One More Time

LINEUP: Peter Wolf, J. Geils, Seth Justman, Danny Klein, Magic Dick, Stepehen Jo Bladd.

WHAT’S IT ALL ABOUT: Followup record for R&B and blues revivalists has some decent tracks, but some sound as hazy and lazy as the album cover.

SOME WORDS, PHRASES AND CLAUSES ABOUT THIS RECORD: The hottest cut of this record “It Ain’t What You Do (It’s How You Do It)” is the final cut, and by then it’s a little too late to save this overall.

The covers seem a bit flat, and a few originals (like “Looking for a Love”) are fine, but overall this just seems a bit…off.

Most of these tracks probably sounded great live, but this time they were flat on record. “Whammer Jammer” also probably needed to just be a live cut since those versions smoke the studio version like crazy.

NOTES & MINUTIAE: Gram Parsons covered “Cry One More Time” on a solo record.

IS THERE A DELUXE VERSION: No

GRADE: B-: The few hot cuts save this from being a totally cold record.

The J. Geils Band – The J. Geils Band

ARTIST: The J. Geils Band  J._Geils_Band_-_The_J._Geils_Band

TITLE:  The J. Geils Band

YEAR RELEASED: 1970

CHART ACTION: #195

SINGLES: Homework, Wait

OTHER SONGS YOU MAY KNOW: First I Look at the Purse, Hard Drivin’ Man

LINEUP: Peter Wolf, Seth Justman, J. Geils, Daniel Klien, Stephen Jo Bladd, Magic Dick

WHAT’S IT ALL ABOUT: Retro R&B and blues review with a great live reputation releases its debut that gives you some of their live energy.

SOME WORDS, PHRASES AND CLAUSES ABOUT THIS RECORD: Going somewhat against the grain for the times, the J. Geils Band turned their love into blues, R&B, and soul music into a long career with a great reputation for a live band. Their debut album definitely shows their love for that music, and their ability to write songs in that vein.

Frontman Peter Wolf displayed the attitude and ability already that endeared him to fans, while the band was tight and competent at all of the requisite styles. They showed their love for the music by some very loving covers of even-then obscure blues and Motown tunes.

On some cuts, it does show that they were hesitant or restricted in the studio, as the cuts in no way sounded as exuberant as the live records (especially on the great “Hard Drivin’ Man”). It’s a great album though and fits right in with every other J. Geils record.

NOTES & MINUTIAE: This album has the only song solo credited to J. Geils himself, “Ice Breaker (For the Big ‘M’)”.

IS THERE A DELUXE VERSION: No.

GRADE: A-: Great rock, R&B and blues for a band that’s much deeper than their radio hits.