Category: Led Zeppelin

Led Zeppelin – Led Zeppelin II

ARTIST: Led Zeppelin              220px-Led_Zeppelin_-_Led_Zeppelin_II (1)

TITLE:  Led Zeppelin II

YEAR RELEASED: 1969

CHART ACTION: #1 US, #1 UK

SINGLES: Whole Lotta Love (#4 US), Living Loving Maid (She’s Just a Woman (#65 US)

OTHER SONGS YOU MAY KNOW: The whole damn thing, unless you’ve been in the Marianas Trench.

LINEUP: Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Paul Jones, John Bonham

WHAT’S IT ALL ABOUT: The album that made Led Zeppelin Led Zeppelin.

SOME WORDS, PHRASES AND CLAUSES ABOUT THIS RECORD: A simple three note riff concocted by Jimmy Page for a song directly stolen from Willie Dixon created the beast known as Led Zeppelin. Had “Whole Lotta Love” been absent from this Earth, what would classic rock stations build their playlists around?

This album had the blues (another one was stolen – from Leadbelly in “The Lemon Song”), ROCK (see above, along with “Living Loving Maid”), Robert Plant being all lovey dovey, and space form Jimmy Page and John Bonham to jizz all over the control board. Rock and roll man. Rock and roll.

As a teenager, this was the record by them I played the most. (My girlfriend at the time cringed when I sang along to “The Lemon Song”.Blame her?) Now, it’s one I play the least. It’s the most predictable, the most cliché ridden, and some tracks are skipped with regularity. I mean, it’s GOOD, but not great except for a couple tracks, and they stole one of them.

NOTES & MINUTIAE: They got nabbed for plagiarism, and now the credits for “Whole Lotta Love” and “The Lemon Song” have put right that thievery.

IS THERE A DELUXE VERSION: Yes. A bonus disc with backing tracks and rough mixes, with one unheard intro/outro that is very unique.

GRADE: B+: A couple tracks are boring, a couple tracks are just exercises in overplaying, and there are a few gems. But it’s the Zep I turn to the least, despite the highlights.

Led Zeppelin – Led Zeppelin

ARTIST: Led Zeppelin           Led_Zeppelin_-_Led_Zeppelin_(1969)_front_cover

TITLE: Led Zeppelin

YEAR RELEASED: 1969

CHART ACTION: #7 US, #6 UK

SINGLES: Good Times Bad Times (#80)

OTHER SONGS YOU MAY KNOW: Dazed and Confused

LINEUP: Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, John Bonham, John Paul Jones

WHAT’S IT ALL ABOUT: The debut from the rock and roll behemoth is mostly blues rock, with a couple of interesting diversions and a closing cut that points their way to domination.

SOME WORDS, PHRASES AND CLAUSES ABOUT THIS RECORD: From the ashes of the Yardbirds Jimmy Page emerged. With studio whiz John Paul Jones and relative unknowns Robert Plant and John Bonham in tow, the new group recorded this album on their own and gave it to Atlantic Records. The company eagerly snapped it up, and the rest is history.

Most of the album is rooted in the blues, much like the Yardbirds. Two Willie Dixon tunes (“You Shook Me” and “I Can’t Quit You Baby”) were pure blues, while “Babe I’m Gonna Leave You” was a standard of blues and rock bands throughout the 60’s. “Dazed and Confused” is definitely in a slow blues style.

The album’s most important cuts diverge from the blues. “Good Times Bad Times” and “How Many More Times” are riff driven, and while the latter does use some blues call-and-response, and ref3erences blues songs, the riff is pure hard rock. “Communication Breakdown”, on the other hand, has a riff that could be a speed metal or punk riff – miles ahead of its time. Most heavy songs at the time were slow and lumbering – not this one.

The band tends to ramble on some cuts (they needed an editor), and their version of “You Shook Me” isn’t as good as the Jeff Beck Groups, but this debut changed the course of rock in three cuts.

NOTES & MINUTIAE: When the Yardbirds split, Jimmy Page had the rights to the name of the band, and had to tour Scandinavia to fulfill contracts. So he recruited this band as “The New Yardbirds”, and then changed the name.

IS THERE A DELUXE VERSION: One bonus track, the title track.

GRADE: A-:  “How Many More Times” points to the future.