Category: Tupac Shakur

Tupac Shakur – Strictly for My N.I.G.G.A.Z.

ARTIST: Tupac Shakur                  220px-Strictly_4_My_N.I.G.G.A.Z

TITLE:  Strictly 4 My N.I.G.G.A.Z…

YEAR RELEASED: 1993

CHART ACTION: #24, #4 R&B

SINGLES: Holla If Ya Hear Me, I Get Around (#11, #5 R&B, #8 Rap), Keep Ya Head Up (#12, #7 R&B, #2 Rap), Papa’z Song (#87, #82 R&B, #24 Rap)

OTHER SONGS YOU MAY KNOW: Tupac and rap fans know this.

LINEUP: Tupac with lots of guests

WHAT’S IT ALL ABOUT: Commercial breakout for Tupac, which is uncompromising and hardcore politically.

SOME WORDS, PHRASES AND CLAUSES ABOUT THIS RECORD: Tupac’s second album opened with “Holla If Ya Hear Me”, which isn’t that different from his first album, but soon, as the album unspools, you realize this is a different beast altogether.

Tupac’s rhymes are definitely more political, social, and geared to an audience outside of WASP America. The beats and samples are definitely more inventive and interesting. The guests on the album break up the monotony, and add flavor and depth.

Sometimes, though, it wears you out. It’s not comfortable to listen to start to finish at times, because it just hits you so hard. Good art does that, though. But it’s also a bit long, and maybe a couple of songs could have been trimmed and made “B” sides.

OTES & MINUTIAE: It was originally supposed to be Troublesome 21, but that was scrapped.

IS THERE A DELUXE VERSION: No.

GRADE: B+: A little too long, and it’s very direct. But it’s a fairly essential album with some flaws.

Tupac Shakur – 2Pacalypse Now

ARTIST: Tupac Shakur 2pacalypse_now
TITLE: 2Pacalypse Now
YEAR RELEASED: 1991
CHART ACTION: #64
SINGLES: Brenda’s Got a Baby (#10 R&B), If My Homie Calls, Trapped
OTHER SONGS YOU MAY KNOW: Young Black Male,
LINEUP: Tupac Shakur, Shock G, Pogo, DJ Fuze, Money B, Mac Moore, Pee-Wee, Stretch, Dave Hollister, Ray Luv, Angelique, Poppi, various others and producers.
WHAT’S IT ALL ABOUT: Debuit disc finds Tupac rapping honestly about life on the streets, however without a lot of hooks to implant the rhymes into your brain.

SOME WORDS, PHRASES AND CLAUSES ABOUT THIS RECORD: Six producers and one executive producer and four months is what it took Tupac to get his hip-hop debut out on the streets. And streets is where his raps are from. He’s very honest about what he’s seen out there, and what he sees as problems for his community.

The raps are good, as well as the rhymes. The fact that there were a lot of hands on this makes the album not as unified and it doesn’t cohere musically. There aren’t a lot of hooks, either, so nothing grabs you and pulls you in. Even hardcore hip-hop needs a hook if you want the listener to remember (and to have radio play it).

It’s a promising start for his career, and a debut that would be influential for many young rappers afterwards.

NOTES & MINUTIAE: Dan Quayle stated that there was “no reason for a record like this to be released. It has no place in our society,” totally missing the point.

IS THERE A DELUXE VERSION: No

GRADE: B: Good, not the best, and without hooks the raps kind of slip by you.