Category: War

War – Anthology: 1970-1994

ARTIST: War 

TITLE: Anthology 1970-1994

YEAR RELEASED: Compilation

CHART ACTION:  None

SINGLES: Top 20: Spill the Wine (#3 US), All Day Music (#35 US, #18 R&B), Slippin’ Into Darkness (#16 US, #12 R&B), The World Is a Ghetto (#7 US, #3 R&B), Cisco Kid (#2 US, #5 R&B), Gypsy Man (#8 US, #6 R&B), Me and Baby Brother (#15 US, #18 R&B, #21 UK), Ballero (#33 US, #17 R&B), Why Can’t We Be Friends? (#6 US, #9 R&B), Low Rider (#7 US, #1 R&B, #12 UK), Summer (#7 US, #4 R&B), LA Sunshine (#45 US, #2 R&B), Galaxy (#39 US, #5 R&B, #14 UK), You Got the Power (#66 US, #18 R&B, #58 UK), Outlaw (#94 US, #13 R&B)

OTHER SONGS YOU MAY KNOW: They covered Tobacco Road. Who didn’t?.

LINEUP: Howard Scott, Lee Oskar, Papa Dee Allen, Charles Miller, BB Dickerson, Lonnie Jordan, Harold Ray Brown. Eric Burdon peaced out after two albums (for the best). Others came in after their glory days.

WHAT’S IT ALL ABOUT: LA socially conscious soul band discovered by Eric Burdon and producer Jerry Goldstein sheds Burdon after two records, and becomes an chart mainstay for the 70’s

SOME WORDS, PHRASES AND CLAUSES ABOUT THIS RECORD: Playing around LA for most of the 60’s, War (then known as Nightshift) was brought on to back Eric Burdon on his next venture. Burdon brought in Danish harmonica player Lee Oskar, who soon became an integral part of their sound.

Burdon left mid-tour after two albums because of health reasons, but War kept chugging along. Their second album after Burdon left established their popularity, and through most of the 70’s were mainstays in the R&B charts, and making some impact in crossing over.

The unique sound of War was fueled by congas along with drums, mixed with the combo of sax and harmonica, over the typical funk bass, drums, and keyboards. They had a tendency to jam and extend on the albums (and live, their mid-70’s live double had SEVEN tracks spread over four sides), but a collection like this distills their meanderings to a pretty concise package, at least for the songs.

They’re an important and vital group, as shown by the number of samples of War material in hip-hop now. A large collection is warranted, but this dips too much into their 80s and 90s material, which diminishes the impact of their key period.

NOTES & MINUTIAE: When Goldstein and Burdon found them, they were backing football player Deacon Jones in clubs around LA.

IS THERE A DELUXE VERSION: No, but in 2003 there was another comp called “The Very Best of War”, which has many of the same cuts. However, they truncate some of the songs even more (for better or worse).

 GRADE: A-: Their 70’s work is so critical to R&B and hip-hop, I can safely exile the later stuff and still be happy with this grade.